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dr martens womens shoes About the editor’s note

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Regarding my letter published Dec. 12, I feel compelled to reply to the editor’s note that was attached by the Telegram. The editor notes a 2011 article about changes to health insurance for employees in the Superior school district. That’s all well and good, but you’ve still missed a major part of the story. Please allow me to explain.

When it comes to health insurance, there are two major costs that must be considered. The cost of having insurance is one thing, but the cost of using your insurance is quite another. In 2011, the School Board increased the employee cost of having insurance, by increasing the employee contributions for the insurance premiums, and thereby reducing the district’s contributions. Although that was a significant change, many of us understood the need for the change and started paying higher premiums to still have decent health insurance.

However, in 2012, the district changed their available insurance coverage that made it unaffordable for many employees. This second step changed the cost of using your insurance. I previously gave an example of this change. The quadrupling of family deductibles from $1,500 to $6,000 per year was followed by other changes that made the insurance too expensive for many families to use, including my own. Therefore we dropped the district insurance altogether. It is this type of cost savings where I am looking for some transparency from the district and some reporting from the Telegram.

There is another very important difference between these two changes: the change in the cost of having insurance was done under collective bargaining, while the change in the cost of using the insurance happened without collective bargaining. During the 2014 election, I heard pundits say that no one could point to anything bad that happened as a result of Gov. Scott Walker eliminating some of the public employee unions. Not true. Employees of the Superior school district can most certainly do so.

In 2011, my wife took a job with the Superior school district that had low pay and good benefits. We didn’t go into it blindly. We were willing to settle for the pay because the family health insurance was worth as much to us as her pay sort of a 50/50 proposition. When the district forced our hand by making the cost of using the health insurance unbearable. We dropped the insurance,
dr martens style shoes About the editor's note
effectively wiping out 50 percent of my wife’s compensation from the district. From the first day she started, she has absolutely loved her job and continues to do so today. 12, I feel compelled to reply to the editor’s note that was attached by the Telegram. The editor notes a 2011 article about changes to health insurance for employees in the Superior school district. That’s all well and good, but you’ve still missed a major part of the story. Please allow me to explain.

When it comes to health insurance, there are two major costs that must be considered. The cost of having insurance is one thing, but the cost of using your insurance is quite another. In 2011, the School Board increased the employee cost of having insurance, by increasing the employee contributions for the insurance premiums, and thereby reducing the district’s contributions. Although that was a significant change, many of us understood the need for the change and started paying higher premiums to still have decent health insurance.

However, in 2012, the district changed their available insurance coverage that made it unaffordable for many employees. This second step changed the cost of using your insurance. I previously gave an example of this change. The quadrupling of family deductibles from $1,500 to $6,000 per year was followed by other changes that made the insurance too expensive for many families to use, including my own. Therefore we dropped the district insurance altogether. It is this type of cost savings where I am looking for some transparency from the district and some reporting from the Telegram.

There is another very important difference between these two changes: the change in the cost of having insurance was done under collective bargaining, while the change in the cost of using the insurance happened without collective bargaining. During the 2014 election, I heard pundits say that no one could point to anything bad that happened as a result of Gov. Scott Walker eliminating some of the public employee unions. Not true. Employees of the Superior school district can most certainly do so.

In 2011, my wife took a job with the Superior school district that had low pay and good benefits. We didn’t go into it blindly. We were willing to settle for the pay because the family health insurance was worth as much to us as her pay sort of a 50/50 proposition. When the district forced our hand by making the cost of using the health insurance unbearable. We dropped the insurance, effectively wiping out 50 percent of my wife’s compensation from the district. From the first day she started, she has absolutely loved her job and continues to do so today. Sadly, I have grown to hate her job because she is so severely undercompensated by the school district.
dr martens style shoes About the editor's note